Moving to New Location in Redwood City: 2900 Whipple Ave

On February 1st 2014, our Redwood City location is moving from 801 Brewster Avenue, Suite 240 to:


2900 Whipple Ave, Suite 210

Redwood City, CA 94062


Our phone number will remain the same: (650) 366–4542


Don’t hesitate to get a hold of us if you have any questions about the new office. Thanks to all our patients, and we look forward to seeing our patients at our new location!

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Four Home Remedies That Never Fail

Four Home Remedies That Never Fail

Medicine wasn’t always a pharmaceutical product, but rather materials one kind find in their own kitchen. Whether you are feeling under the weather and don’t have time for another trip to the pharmacy or you are concerned about the compound effects some drugs will have on your body, you will want to know about these easy home remedies for common ailments.


One great solution for a sore throat is simply a glass of salty water. The saline solution will reduce inflammation, as well as clear out allergens and bacteria that may be causing additional discomfort.


To see how this and a few other excellent remedies work, read Mandy Seay’s Home Remedies that Never Fail.

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Plantar Fasciitis - The Athlete’s Arch Nemesis

Plantar Fasciitis The Athletes Arch Nemesis

Do you find your feet to be in aching pain when going for a run in the morning or afternoon? Is it an intense, sharp pain on the heel of your foot and arch? You are not alone. Most likely, you are one of the ten percent of Americans who have an inflammatory condition in their feet known as “plantar fasciitis”. Plantar fasciitis is caused by stress in the foot’s arch tendon, and it can affect anyone. It is one of the most common medical conditions seen in America, affecting over two million people per year. It accounts for over one million physician visits yearly. Those who are most at risk are athletes, soldiers, and obese people who find themselves standing frequently and placing heavy strain on their feet.


Athletes of all levels and abilities are particularly vulnerable, because they are frequently driven to overtrain. Today more Americans than ever are under constant pressure to succeed at the next level, and neglecting healthy and recuperative rest leads to chronic strains and tears in ligaments. Furthermore, with increasing competition from other players to take over starting roles on a team, athletes are pressured more than ever to rush through injury rehabilitation. Without proper healing time, an athlete can quickly fall into a cycle of failing to properly heal and re-aggravating inflammatory conditions.


Pathology

Plantar fasciitis is the most common cause of pain on the bottom of the heel. The plantar fascia, a fibrous band of tissue that supports the arches, becomes inflamed and irritated. The plantar fascia is a very thin ligament that connects the heel to the front of the foot in order to absorb stress and shock that we place on our feet. The direct result of straining this ligament? Pain, swelling, weakness, and irritation that affects daily living activities.


Symptoms

The symptoms are generally noted as an intense sharp heel pain when a person takes her first few steps of activity. Sometimes there is occasional relief of the pain after a few minutes. However, the feet will hurt more as the day goes on, if activity (and weight-bearing pressure) continues. Walking on hard surfaces is especially hard on the plantar fascia.


Relief

Plantar fasciitis is usually a difficult problem to completely eliminate. However, treatment is generally nonsurgical and conservative in nature. To reduce pain and swelling, many physicians recommend taking an over-the-counter pain reliever like ibuprofen (Advil or Motrin), naproxen (Aleve), or aspirin. It will also help to do preventative calf stretches several times a day, especially when waking up and beginning daily exercises. Try to not run or walk on hard surfaces, and pick shoes that have good arch support and well-cushioned soles.


This article was written in collaboration with Haroon Andar MS on UglyFinish.com.


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5 Geat Alternative Exercises for Osteoarthritis

Alternative Exercises for Osteoarthritis

Osteoarthritis, being a debilitating and painful disease, can turn athletes into couch potatoes. We all understand that exercise is important to stay healthy and live longer, but it’s tough for those with osteoarthritis to do the bare minimum of exercise. The catch 22 of osteoarthritis is that exercise is an important way to reduce pain in the joints and prevent the pain from getting worse in the future. EverydayHealth.com showcases a few low impact exercises that allow patients with osteoarthritis to maintain their health and keep their joint pain from worsening:


1. Tai Chi

2. Yoga

3. Qigong

4. Water Aerobics

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The Bionic Knee: Improving Joints Without Surgery

Bionicare Knee System

I was featured in an article from SOMA Orthopedics a while ago. It’s still relevant, so I wanted to share it with you!

Ashley is an avid cyclist who started noticing increased pain earlier and earlier in her exercise routine after she turned 42. When she learned she had an early form of arthritis, she asked her physician if there were any safe, non-invasive treatments for the condition. Her physician told her about the BioniCare Knee Device, an exciting alternative to the use of medications or surgery for knee pain due to joint wear and tear.


“Ashley’s case is somewhat unique,” said Dr. Moshe Lewis, a Physical Medicine and rehabilitation physician at California Pacific Medical Center, St. Luke’s Campus. “Osteoarthritis occurs more frequently in males before the age of 45. Women are more prone to the disease after age 55.”


Osteoarthritis is the breakdown and eventual loss of the articular cartilage in one or more joints and occurs more frequently as we age. This process destroys the cushion-like qualities of cartilage, which is a natural shock absorber. About 50 million Americans suffer from some form of osteoarthritis and is sometimes found in multiple members of the same family, implying a genetic basis for the condition.


With aging, the water content of the cartilage in the knee increases and the protein makeup degenerates. Repetitive use of the joints over the years irritates and inflames the cartilage, causing joint pain and swelling. Eventually, cartilage begins to degenerate by flaking or forming tiny cracks. In advanced cases of osteoarthritis, there is a complete loss of the cartilage cushion between the bones of the joints. The result is friction, leading to pain and reduced joint mobility.


Dr. Lewis specializes in non-surgical treatments for conditions that cause chronic pain, such as arthritis and degenerative disc disease. In the past two years, he has placed the Bionicare Knee Device on more than 100 patients.


“The device has reduced the use of pain medications and, in some cases, postponed the need for surgery in these patients,” Lewis said. “Active people want to stay healthy and perform at peak levels longer without pain. As a result, there is a growing interest in treatment options that have few side effects and the BioniCare device is a great example of that technology.”


The Knee Device was cleared for home use by the Food and Drug Administration in 2004 and requires a physician prescription. It transmits pulsed electrical stimulation to the knee and may help rejuvenate of cartilage. During therapy, a wrap is applied and worn for 8-10 hours, typically while the patient sleeps. Patient’s who accumulate more than 750 hours of cumulative wearing time demonstrate the best results.


“This product has proven itself to be a great alternative for people like Ashley, who are in the early stages of osteoarthritis and wish to remain active without being dependent on pain medications or invasive procedures,” Lewis said. “It’s really represents good news.”

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How You Can Reduce RSI Risk

How you can reduce RSI risk

Every day at work you execute thousands of precise, frenetic keystrokes while hunched painfully over a monitor. You text and type and staple and file throughout the day, performing a daily marathon with your forearms and fingers.


And like a marathoner, your tireless performance comes at the cost of physical pain. If left unchecked, your low-impact daily tasks may put you at risk for a repetitive stress injury.


Repetitive stress injuries, or RSIs, are caused by repeated everyday actions. The two most common RSIs are tendinitis, the inflammation of a tendon; and bursitis, the inflammation of a bursa sac. Some well-known examples include carpal tunnel syndrome and tennis elbow.


Though repetitive stress injuries often start as an inconvenient ache, the symptoms can become far more severe if they are ignored. People sometimes assume that their risk of RSI depends on the amount of time spent on a certain action. The time spent is actually less important than the number of repetitions.


For example, if you spent two hours typing only 100 words, your risk is far lower than a friend who typed an epic 2,000 words in only 20 minutes. Furthermore, if your friend repeated her typing binge several times daily over weeks and months, she might start to accumulate orthopedic damage if she didn’t rest prudently.


This repetition of a task over time is what leads to RSI symptoms. The most severe RSIs require physical therapy and medication—even surgery. But the majority of RSIs are easily reversible. Paying attention to posture and switching to more ergonomic products can help to prevent or alleviate painful symptoms.


Computer use is a leading cause of office-related RSIs. To fight this epidemic, many ergonomic products are now available to help improve your posture and take stress off vulnerable joints. One of the most common and effective office aids is the ergonomic keyboard. Its split curved keypad surface elevates typing hands to a less damaging posture. Critics have questioned the effectiveness of ergonomic keyboards since their inception, but it’s hard to argue with results; a 2010 study showed that typists with RSI-related disorders were able to reduce the severity of their symptoms by using ergonomic keyboards.


But what about the computer user on the go? In this modern era, mobility is everything, and laptops are more common than ever. But a laptop is a terrible surface for a portable computer. The hip-height keyboard and screen put strain on your wrists and your neck, and your lap is less steady than a table, which also makes for high-stress typing.


To reduce RSI risk, try elevating the computer to eye level and connecting an external keyboard to your laptop. This will allow you to use the computer as comfortably and ergonomically as you might use a desktop.


If you are at risk for RSIs, it may be best to avoid buying an ultra-compact netbook. Netbooks have keyboards that are smaller than regular laptops, and this can increase the likelihood of typing with incorrect posture.


Phone texting and browsing have become key parts of professional communication, and they have simultaneously become a frequent source of RSIs. Smartphones tend to be heavier than regular cell phones. Android phones and iPhones increase RSI risk for the very reasons they make such enticing gadgets—the touch-screen and added functionality make them more useful, and thus they tend to keep your fingers active when you might otherwise be still.


A recent study suggests that to reduce the likelihood of RSI, you should use both thumbs when texting and take breaks between writing messages. If you find your hands truly in need of rest, try an old-fashioned remedy: use your phone to talk instead of type.


Your home life has just as many possible sources of RSIs. Cooking, gardening, needlecraft, and leisure sports all have their own risks. Game controllers are notorious culprits.


To prevent home and leisure injuries, simply remember that even light exercise puts stress on joints. During leisure time, take it easy. Stretch before playing and take breaks before a slight stiffness becomes a full-blown injury.


This article was featured at SFGate.

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BioniCare Knee System: Improving Joints without Surgery

The BioniCare Knee System Improving Joints without Surgery

In the following press release, I offer a personal testimonial for VQ OrthoCare’s BioniCare Knee System, a utility and alternative treatment for reducing osteoarthritis-induced knee pain and enabling increased functionality.


Ashley is an avid cyclist who started noticing pain earlier in her exercise routine after she turned 42. When she learned that she had an early form of arthritis, she asked her physician if there were any safe, non-invasive treatments available for the condition. Her physician told her about the BioniCare Knee System, an exciting alternative to the use of medications or surgery for knee pain due to joint wear and tear.


“Ashley’s case is somewhat unique,” said Dr. Moshe Lewis, a Physical Medicine and rehabilitation physician at California Pacific Medical Center, St. Luke’s Campus. “Osteoarthritis occurs more frequently in males before the age of 45. Women are more prone to the disease after age 55.”


Osteoarthritis is the breakdown of the knee joints and occurs more frequently as we age. This process destroys the cushion-like qualities of the knee joint, which performs as a natural shock absorber. About 50 million Americans suffer from some form of osteoarthritis and it is sometimes found in multiple members of the same family, implying a genetic basis for the condition.


With aging, the water content within the knee increases and the protein makeup degenerates. Repetitive use of the joints over the years irritates and inflames the knee joint, causing pain and swelling. In advanced cases of osteoarthritis, there is a complete loss of the cushion between the bones of the joints. The result of this is friction, leading to pain and reduced joint mobility.


Dr. Lewis specializes in non-surgical treatments for conditions that cause chronic pain, such as arthritis and degenerative disc disease. In the past four years, he has placed the BioniCare Knee System on more than 100 patients.


“The device has reduced the use of pain medications and, in some cases, postponed the need for surgery in these patients,” Lewis said. “Active people want to stay healthy and perform at peak levels longer without pain. As a result, there is a growing interest in treatment options that have few side effects and the BioniCare device is a great example of that technology.”


The BioniCare Knee System was cleared for home use by the Food and Drug Administration in 2004 and requires a physician prescription. The system transmits pulsed electrical stimulation to the knee to reduce pain and improve overall function. During therapy, a wrap is applied, and worn for 8–10 hours, typically while the patient sleeps. Patients who accumulate more than 250 hours of cumulative wearing time demonstrate results (roughly one month), with full results at 2,250 hours (roughly 9 months).


“This product has proven itself to be a great alternative for people like Ashley, who are in the early stages of osteoarthritis, looking for long term results and wish to remain active without being dependent on pain medications or invasive procedures,” Lewis said. “It really represents good news in Osteoarthritis treatment.”


Dr. Moshe Lewis specializes in the non-surgical management of musculoskeletal and neurological injuries and diseases. He has devoted his professional career to providing compassionate care to people who suffer with chronic pain. He can be reached through his website www.mosheleiwsmd.com. For more information on VQ OrthoCare’s BioniCare® Knee System or the OActive™ Knee Brace, please visit, www.bionicare.com or call (800) 444–1456.

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Are Springtime Sniffles Giving You a Headache?

Are Springtime Sniffles Giving You a Headache

Although spring is a notorious harbinger of sneezing, watery eyes, and other classic symptoms of a seasonal allergy, these symptoms often persist well into the summer. Since trees generally stop pollinating by the end of spring, grasses and weeds produce the most pollen during this season. Pollen being the most prominent offender, additional heat and humidity from the summer climate can make a nasty combination. If you’re traveling this summer, be sure to keep an eye out for possible allergens at your destination such as ragweed and even insects like dust mites that can cause irritation and a runny nose.


It makes sense that while changes in weather, such as barometric pressure, high humidity, extremes of heat and cold are known to bring about migraine headaches, studies are also finding a relationship exists with allergies. From a recent piece in Everyday Health:

Research published in the Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology found that seasonal allergies are related not just to regular headaches but also to migraine headaches. Of the 76 people in the study with seasonal allergies, 34 percent also had migraines, compared with a migraine rate of just 4 percent among people who didn’t get seasonal allergies.

The seasonal allergies-headache association was also made in a study published in the journal Headache, which looked at 536 people with allergies and headache symptoms. Researchers at the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine discovered that advancing age and severity of allergies are among the factors that contribute to more frequent migraines.

Migraines can be downright awful, but there are a few ways to deal with them. A headache specialist can help you determine the cause of your headaches and provide an appropriate course of medication which might include drugs called triptans that relieve swelling in the brain. Alternative, natural remedies might include the use of ice packs applied to the forehead and meditation.


For additional suggestions, visit a recent post on the The JetMD Blog called Quick Remedies for Headache Pain.


Read Are Springtime Sniffles Giving You a Headache? from Everyday Health to learn more about how migraine headaches and changes in season are related and what to do about it.

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See Your iDoctor - Mens Health Magazine Features Dr. Lewis

See Your iDoctor Moshe Menshealth

Download this article from MensHealth (PDF).


There are more opportunities to monitor your health than ever before since such innovations in personal computing as smartphones and tablets that changed the way we communicate and store information. There’s nothing wrong with pen and paper, but your pen won’t check your heart rate for you. You can find the app Instant Heart Rate in the iPhone app store for free, and it is a handy tool for measuring your heart’s beats per minute.


Men’s Health Magazine has a piece detailing other great utilities:

Hurt? SportsInjuryClinic has the lowdown on more than 100 different sports-related injuries. Compare symptoms, receive rehab info, and watch YouTube treatment videos, a favorite feature of Moshe Lewis, M.D., chief of physical medicine and rehabilitation at California Pacific Medical Center. Just make sure you clear any new exercises with your doctor first.

To view the article in your browser, visit their online magazine (pages 56 & 68).

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Quick Remedies for Headache Pain

Quick Remedies for Headache Pain

It can be tempting, or even necessary, to use pain killers in moments of extreme discomfort—especially when it disrupts our productivity and our lives. Headaches, a universally common symptom, are frequently the culprit behind these effects and while they can be alleviated with compounds such as acetaminophen and ibuprofen, there are other methods available to those who are concerned about their medicating habits.


In a piece for EverydayHealth I talk about how temperature, light sensitivity, sleep, and other factors can change the way you feel and how to use this knowledge to relieve headaches naturally.

“It is easy to become reliant on drugs — we all live in a fast-paced nation, and there is little understanding when you miss obligations over a headache,” says Moshe Lewis, MD, a pain management specialist in Redwood City, Calif.

For example, acupressure, a procedure that utilizes familiar acupuncture principles but involves instead pressure rather than the insertion of needles, may prove beneficial:

Performed by a qualified practitioner, acupressure can bring relief for headaches and a variety of other pain-related conditions, says Lewis. Japanese research explains that acupressure may work by stimulating the autonomic nervous system, which is why it may have an impact on headache and related conditions such as chronic neck pain. Though recent studies haven’t been done, earlier research on 500 people with frequent headaches found that self-administered acupressure was helpful and worth trying because there are no negative side effects.

If you’d like to know more, read the article at EverydayHealth.com.

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Kick Start Your Summer Without Injuring Yourself

Kick Start Your Summer Without Injuring Yourself

Your health is important, and after a long winter of reduced activity or inactivity you might be tempted to ditch those old winter habits, go outside, and train as soon as the weather improves.


According to Moshe Lewis, MD, chief of physical medicine and rehabilitation at California Pacific Center, St. Luke’s Campus in the Department of Orthopedics, although you may be tempted to exercise at the same level you did at the end of the last season, such enthusiasm often leads to early season injuries.


If you changed your routine for the winter, you need to get back into shape slowly. The following are some tips from Dr. Lewis for avoiding injuries as you increase your exercise this summer.


1. Slow and steady — don’t overdo it

Try to exercise three to four times per week on alternate days. One of the best ways to get injured or sore is to go hard all weekend and do nothing during the week. Don’t succumb to the weekend warrior syndrome. You will also have higher risk of damage to your ligaments if you overexert yourself. Remember to pace yourself and increase your training gradually over the weeks. Adding one hundred steps to your daily routine will add a tiny bit to your fitness level, if you keep it up. Your body will adapt.


2. Cross train

Alternating your workouts can improve your performance and reduce the risk of injuries. By participating in a variety of different activities such as running, weight training, hiking, or biking, you limit the stress on one specific muscle group because different activities use muscles in slightly different ways. Muscles are easy. They adapt and get stronger fast. And that is why you get injured.


3. Avoid exercising in pain

As you ease back into training you may experience some minor muscle aches and soreness. But if you have any sharp, unusual pain, or soreness that doesn’t go away, pay close attention. You may be on the way to an injury. Listen to the early warning signs of an injury, otherwise you increase your chances of tissue and muscle tear, which can often lead to permanent long-term damage.


5. Train with others who share the same enthusiasm as you

If you can find a few people with the same fitness level and goals as you it can help keep you progressing at a good pace. Working out in a group provides support, accountability, and structure. You are more likely to complete a well-rounded exercise routine and stay on track with your fitness regimen.


6. Don’t be so hard on yourself

Getting back into shape is often slow and difficult, and you have to ramp up your intensity level and exercise routines gradually. Remember you have to pace yourself, and if you took the winter off don’t expect to be back at your peak fitness in a week or two.


Take your time and keep in mind that summer training is a time for fun, light-hearted exercise. You aren’t competing so just relax, enjoy your activity, and enjoy the summer.


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Baby Boomers Can Refrain From Pain Between Pills And Surgery


In the interview above, I talk with Stephanie Stephens from Mind Your Body about ways to control pain while avoiding surgery and pills. If you’re wondering what viscosupplementation is, or how radio frequency ablation works you’ll find the video helpful. Additional topics include: epidurals, TENS unit, pain pumps, and nerve/facet blocks.


Watch this video on YouTube.

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5 Great Alternative Exercises for Osteoarthritis - Low-Impact Ways to Ease Joint Pain

5 Great Alternative Exercises for Osteoarthritis  Low Impact Ways to Ease Joint Pain

While movement with osteoarthritis can be arduous, it actually can be a great way to relieve pain when done right. Some of the keys to look for in a good approach to exercise is a focus on low impact movement and, not surprisingly, fun. In a recent piece for EverydayHealth, I discuss how activities such as tai chi and water aerobics can improve your quality of life. By both strengthening your body and alleviating stress, these 5 activities can make life both more comfortable and enjoyable. Give them a try!


  1. Tai Chi
  2. Yoga
  3. Qigong
  4. Water Aerobics
  5. Belly Dancing

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Video: 5 Tips for Workplace Wellness Routines


Download the video

Watch this video on YouTube


It’s no secret that it can be really difficult to maintain your fitness and overall health when so many of your days are spent in the office. Employees can develop carpal tunnel from repetitive wrist movements and a constant deficiency in circulation can cause a number of cardiovascular problems. There are, however, some great solutions to prevent discomfort and a deterioration in health while at work. Some of the best results come from employers that lead by example and implement programs such as a walking group or a push for ergonomics awareness.


A recent post on the Nuesoft Blog shares some great advice when it comes to workplace wellness. In the featured Neusoft video podcast, I talk with Lindsey Coates about how to engage in a routine that works for everyone as well as how to encourage good habits and comfort. Here are some ideas to get you started:

  1. Designate a coordinator to get everyone involved.
  2. Create a board that will centralize all wellness information (leaflets, routines, leader board – if you want to make it a competition, etc.).
  3. Walk as a group during lunch around the building or floor you are on.
  4. Sit on a yoga ball for an hour a day while working on the computer. When your hour is up pass it to another team member.
  5. Sign up as a group to do a 5k, softball team or other sporting activity. It’ll also promote morale!

To find out more, read the article and watch the interview on the Nuesoft Blog.

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Doctor-Approved Home Remedies

Doctor Approved Home Remedies

While many health problems do require specialized attention, there are some great remedies for health problems that may be in your own kitchen. As an advocate of natural remedies, I contributed to a recent article offering four easy fixes for some common ailments:

  1. If you have chapped lips

    Try: honey and petroleum jelly.

    Why: “Honey has been shown to have both antibacterial and wound-healing properties,” says Adam Friedman, MD, dermatologist and assistant professor of dermatology at Montefiore Medical Center and Albert Einstein College of Medicine. “When you combine it with the moisturizing effect of petroleum jelly, you’re relieving and curing chapped lips.”

    How: Wet lips with lukewarm water, then apply a thin layer of honey to your lips and let it dry for a few seconds. Next, put a layer of petroleum jelly over it and let it sit for 10 to 15 minutes. Remove the moisturizing combo with a cotton swab dipped in warm water. Repeat once daily for a few days.


  2. If you’re starting to get sick

    Try: salt water.

    Why: A saline solution (salt and water) helps soothe inflamed tissues in the throat and also loosens mucus, which helps flush out irritants like allergens and bacteria, says Moshe Lewis, MD, a pain management specialist in San Francisco. In fact, one study found gargling with salt water three times a day reduced respiratory infections up to 40%.

  3. How: Dissolve 1/2 tsp table salt in 8 oz warm water and gargle at least three times a day.


  4. If you have bad breath

    Try: parsley.

    Why: Parsley contains chlorophyll, which is thought to fight the odor-causing bacteria that causes bad breath, says Jennifer Wider, MD, women’s health specialist and host of Am I Normal? on Cosmo Radio, found on Sirius Satellite.

    How: Chew on a fresh sprig for a minute or two whenever necessary.


  5. If you have stomach cramps

    Try: chamomile tea.

    Why: Research found that chamomile contains glycine, a chemical that egresses contractions in the lower intestine and may relieve muscle spasms, says Jessica Shepherd, MD, assistant professor of OB-GYN and women’s health at the University of Illinois at Chicago.

    How: Sip on a cup of chamomile tea at least once a day when you’re feeling crampy.

Read the full article in the Woman’s Day blog.

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Weekday Workaholic, Weekend Warrior

Moshe  Weekday Workaholic Weekend Warrior

If you’ve been working like a weekday robot and using your weekends to workout, you just might be a Weekend Warrior! Weekend sports and outdoor activities like team sports, hikes and swimming are good for both the mind and the body. Plus you’ll feel alive again, until Monday rolls around.


But using physical recreation as a weekends-only reward comes with its own set of risks. Intermittent exercise quickly increases the risk of a muscle strain or ligament tear. Joints can easily be injured without the proper warm-up during the week. Repetitive stress injuries (RSI) like plantar fasciitis or shin splints can put you in a walking boot for weeks. Skimping on weekday workouts leaves muscles stiff and poorly conditioned for weekend performance, so you’re far more likely to get injured.


Luckily, a little bit of preparation goes a long way. You can start immediately to optimize your weekday routines in order to excel at your weekend sports activities. Here are six simple tips that can make your weekend performance better, safer, and more fun:


1. Reach for the Sky

Stretching should always be the first step in a warm-up routine. Basic stretching prevents allows you to prepare the muscles for the work they are going to do, preventing muscle strain injuries. More advanced stretching exercises like yoga and Pilates also improve your balance, core strength, back strength, and conditioning for the spine. You can reap the benefits of stretching even if you are unable to take a dedicated weekday class—just devote fifteen minutes to stretching a few days every week.


I was recently interviewed for a KTVU special on more efficient stretching: Certain Stretches Could Inhibit Athletic Performance


2. Pump Iron or Soup

Strength training is an essential way to build endurance for the Weekend Warrior. Muscles need resistance training to function at their full capacity. Utilize lighter weights with multiple reps to improve tone initially—even doing curls with a soup can will help to tone your muscles for endurance-based activities like hiking or distance running. If you’d like to build strength and bulk, gradually move to higher weights with fewer reps.


3. Get Conditioned

Many of us are weekend warriors by necessity, not choice—our routine simply does not permit a lot of time to train during the week. But if you can find the time for even a little bit of simple aerobic conditioning, you’ll see a huge change in both your weekend performance and your everyday energy level. Light, easy, and low impact activities — jogging, hiking, tennis — are a great way to optimize cardiovascular health, limit further damage to your cartilage and joints while burning calories, thereby mobilizing muscles naturally.


4. What About Supplements?

From Omega 3′s to glucosamine to antioxidants to vitamin D, the right nutrition and dietary supplements can make a big difference in your sports performance and your general well-being. Always consult your doctor, who can support your good health through the appropriate supplements. Remember, a healthy diet, including adequate fluid intake, are essential to all athletes, professionals and weekend warriors alike.


5. Happy Feet Are Healthy Feet

Good ergonomics, posture and even the wear of your shoes can make or break your technique. Take a page from professional athletes, who optimize the mechanics of their technique with custom orthotics, proper shoes, and correct body mechanics. Consider taking a few lessons from a professional trainer in your sport of choice. Also, consider seeing a podiatrist for advice on inserts and shoe wear, especially if you have foot pain. An investment in proper foot support is an investment in your long-term orthopedic health.


6. The Fun Factor

Most importantly, realize that exercise should be fun. This certainly goes for your weekend recreational events, but the fun doesn’t have to end on Sunday night. It’s far easier to keep up on your regular conditioning if you genuinely enjoy it and look forward to it. If you’ve been having trouble jogging to prepare for your weekend pursuits, why not substitute rigorous swing dancing? Swimming? Dog frisbee? Or even aerobic gardening? Any weekday physical activity is better than none, and regular light activity will help your body to be acclimated for weekly hard activity.

Remember that whether you are a full-time athlete or a weekend warrior, physical activity that keeps you moving and having fun will keep you motivated and help you reach your fitness goals.


This article was featured on HeathlyBlackMen.org.

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LAsplash - "Dr. Moshe Lewis Changes The Game of Pain"

Collage lb image page27 14 1 copy

I’ve been kindly featured in an article by Trevor Dagarin on the Splash Magazines blog — you can find the full article on LAsplash.com. I love what I do and it’s very fulfilling to be able to bring relief to my patients and inspire hope in others. It’s an honor to be recognized and a blessing to be able to make a difference.

Dr. Moshe Lewis is an expert and medical specialist in the field of pain management and rehab. As an agent of constant change, Dr. Lewis systematically pieces together ways of integrating medical disciplines. Some include acupuncture, osteopathy, physical therapy, chiropracty and psychotherapy, all with a goal of utilizing noninvasive techniques to increase recovery time for patients with habitual pain and discomfort. Pushing the boundaries is where Dr. Lewis feels most comfortable. “The pain doctor of today and most certainly tomorrow is going to combine the best of the East and West,” said Dr. Lewis. On an individual basis, selecting the appropriate combination of techniques is critical to help relieve or stop a patient’s pain. “I am constantly trying to select novelty therapies some of which are old and some of which are brand new."


Read this article on LAsplash.com.

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Dealing with Chronic Pain: Working Out When You Hurt

Dealing with Chronic Pain Working Out When You Hurt

Exercise is a great way to reduce pain. In fact, a sedentary lifestyle tends to exacerbate pain. It may initially seem that pain can be avoided when you avoid activity, but the truth is muscles atrophy over time and small, daily tasks can become troublesome. But just getting even a little bit of exercise in each day can make a huge difference. The movement that comes from activities such as stretching, walking, and water therapy can loosen up tightened muscles and relieve pain from achy joints. Movement is incredibly effective in the workplace as well–a quick walk around the office could boost your mood and increase productivity. Without painful distractions and frequent discomfort, you can get back to living again.


If you’re looking for some great tips and tricks, see my interview at Fitness and Wellness News.

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6 Ways to Get Through a Painful Workday

6 Ways to Get Through a Painful Workday

Chronic pain causes The United States around $558 billion a year in lost productivity and medical bills. Not surprisingly, thats more than the entire effect of heart disease, America’s number one killer. Chronic pain can be managed to increase your productivity in the workplace.


EverydayHealth has another great article about how to reduce chronic pain in the office. I was interviewed for tips 3 and 4, Move During Your Breaks and Get Help for Heavy Lifting. Here are the links to EverydayHealth’s tips:


1. Practice Good Posture

2. Set Up an Ergonomic Workstation

3. Move During Your Breaks

4. Get Help for Heavy Lifting

5. Wear Comfortable Shoes

Read this EverydayHealth Article on their website.

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Do Women Feel More Pain Than Men?

Do Women Feel More Pain Than Men Study Says  Yes

Chronic pain has the ability to strip individuals of their productivity, happiness, and well-being. ABC News wrote this great piece about Tiiu Leek and her pain in the workplace, describing how women feel more pain than men do. The article references a relatively new study from The Journal of Pain that showed women generally feel more pain than men. However, this study wasn’t thorough since it didn’t account for confounding factors such as emotional effects or an additional painful disease. Women tend to be better at analyzing and describing their pain to doctors which give the illusion they feel more pain. As a culture, men are expected to complain about pain less as well as talk about their emotions. One’s mental well-being has a huge effect on physical pain, thus conclusive studies are hard to produce.  Nevertheless, the findings reflect what I see as a chronic pain specialist. Here is a telling excerpt from the ABC News article:

Meyer saw 13 doctors before she got a proper diagnosis and the majority were men. “It’s very uncomfortable for them to see real emotion: ‘Tell me the facts, m’am, just the facts.’ I see them tune out.”


Now, she consciously spares the doctor the emotional talk. “I can literally be in so much pain I am crying when the staff is in there, but I pull it together when the doctor is in the room and have no tears at all. And it’s not easy to have to do that.”


She said doctors need to listen more to their female patients – “feelings are a part of the equation … Patients shouldn’t have to shut things down.”


Both Meyer and Leek sit on the leadership circle at For Grace, an advocacy organization that educates, supports and empowers women in pain through annual conferences and legislative outreach.


For Grace’s “Fail First” bill recently got through the California State Assembly’s appropriations committee on a 12-5 vote. If signed by the governor, it will allow women in pain much better access to pain medications, bypassing insurance companies.


As for Leek, she has seen marked improvement in her pelvic pain thought exercise and homeopathic approaches. She also tries to surround herself with positive people.


“My career was lost, but not my optimism,” she said. “I continue to live well. I once read that if you can get through your 60s unscathed, you can have a pretty good life.”

Read this article on ABCnews.com 

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Six Tips for the Weekend Warrior

Weekend Warrior

Stretching, warming up, building endurance, taking care of your nutrition and feet, and mainly having fun are great ways to be healthier!


If you’ve been using your weekends to their athletic maximum to make up for sedentary time during the week, congratulations, Weekend Warrior! Weekend sports and outdoor adventures like team sports, hikes, swimming and skiing are good for both the mind and the body. Your well-earned weekend recreation has the added benefits of boosting your mood, reducing stress, increasing muscle and cardiovascular health, and providing a great social outlet.


But using physical recreation as a weekends-only reward comes with its own set of risks. Intermittent exercise quickly increases the risk of a muscle strain or ligament tear. Joints can easily be injured without the proper warm-up during the week. Repetitive stress injuries like plantar fasciitis or shin splints can put you in a walking boot for weeks. Skimping on weekday workouts leaves muscles stiff and poorly conditioned for weekend performance, so you’re far more likely to get injured in the pursuit of weekend excellence.


Luckily, a little bit of preparation goes a long way. You can start immediately to optimize your weekday routines in order to excel at your weekend sports activities. Here are six simple tips that can make your weekend performance better, safer and more fun.


1. Reach for the Sky

Stretching should always be the first step in a warm-up routine. Basic stretching allows you to prepare the muscles for the work they are going to do, preventing muscle strain injuries. More advanced stretching exercises like yoga and Pilates also improve your balance, core strength, back strength, and conditioning for the spine. You can reap the benefits of stretching even if you are unable to take a dedicated weekday class—just devote fifteen minutes to stretching a few days every week. Stretch before any strenuous athletic activity, on the weekend too. For a bit of variety, try an online yoga routine. You’ll feel better during your weekend activities, as well as the rest of your week.


2. Pump Iron, Or Soup

Strength training is an essential way to build endurance for the Weekend Warrior. Muscles need resistance training to function at their full capacity. Utilize lighter weights with multiple reps to improve tone initially—even doing curls with a soup can will help to tone your muscles for endurance-based activities like hiking or distance running. If you’d like to build strength and bulk, gradually move to higher weights with fewer reps. When using heavier weights, don’t forget to rest and pace yourself.


3. Know The Condition

Many of us are weekend warriors by necessity, not choice—our routine simply does not permit a lot of time to train during the week. But if you can find the time for even a little bit of simple aerobic conditioning, you’ll see a huge change in both your weekend performance and your everyday energy level. Activities like light jogging, hiking, aqua-therapy, tai-chi, yoga and rowing are easy, low impact ways to optimize cardiovascular health, limit damage to the cartilage and joint while having our body burn calories, thereby mobilizing muscles in a very natural way. For the athlete who prefers structured activity, a class or a second sport is an ideal way to train for weekend events. Aerobic fitness classes, dance classes, golfing, tennis and cross country skiing can all help you to step up your game while providing good cross training of multiple muscle groups simultaneously. Sometimes even tried-and-true exercises like running can cause knee pain, so don’t hesitate to decrease impact by using the elliptical or hopping in the pool every other day instead.


4. Did You Say Supplements?

From Omega 3′s to glucosamine to antioxidants to vitamin D, the right nutrition and dietary supplements can make a big difference in your sports performance and your general wellbeing. Always consult your doctor, who can support your good health through the appropriate supplements. Remember, a healthy diet, including adequate fluid intake, are essential to all athletes, professionals and weekend warriors alike.


5. Happy Feet Are Healthy Feet

Good ergonomics, posture and even the wear of your shoes can make or break your technique. Take a page from professional athletes, who optimize the mechanics of their technique with custom orthotics, proper shoes, and correct body mechanics. Consider taking a few lessons from a professional trainer in your sport of choice. Also, consider seeing a podiatrist for advice on inserts and shoe wear, especially if you have foot pain. An investment in proper foot support is an investment in your long-term orthopedic health.


6. The Fun Factor

Most importantly, realize that exercise should be fun! This certainly goes for your weekend recreational events, but the fun doesn’t have to end on Sunday night. It’s far easier to keep up on your regular conditioning if you genuinely enjoy it and look forward to it. If you’ve been having trouble jogging to prepare for your weekend pursuits, why not substitute rigorous swing dancing? Swimming? Dog frisbee? Or even aerobic gardening? Any weekday physical activity is better than none, and regular light activity will help your body to be acclimated for weekly hard activity. If you can keep moving, stretching, and having fun during the week, you’ll reach new levels of excellence in your weekend pursuits in no time.


Resources:

1. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19761960

2. Rehab Manag. 2011 Apr;24(3):18-9. An ounce of prevention: physical activity plan can help weekend athletes allay overuse injuries. Berliner M.

3. N J Med. 1991 Sep;88(9):639-40. Recreational sports and the weekend athlete. White KM, McInerney VK, Hirsch PJ.

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Treating Chronic Pain With Alternative Medicine

Alternative Medicine

Carly Zinderman has written a great article on the benefits of alternative medicine and treatments in the chronic pain treatment profession. If you are curious to know why pain management specialists like Lisa Shives, M.D. and I use alternative medicine, take a look at Carly’s article at HealthTree:

People who suffer from chronic pain and other conditions, ranging from sleep disorders to menopausal symptoms like hot flashes, are finding new benefits from alternative medicine. As Eastern and Western medicines draw closer, more and more patients are looking at alternative pain relief than ever before.


Pain management specialist Dr. Moshe Lewis regularly uses alternative therapies, including acupuncture and massage to treat chronic pain. Although he studied traditional medicine at some of the top medical hospitals on the East Coast, including Mount Sinai Medical Center, after moving to California, Lewis began to integrate alternative pain relief into his practice and even maintains an acupuncturist on his staff. Lewis recommends different alternative pain relief methods for each of his patients with chronic pain. Some may find relief in physical therapy and massage, while others benefit from acupuncture.

Read the entire article on HealthTree.com.

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USA Weekend: Important Tips Manage Your Chronic Pain

Important Tips Manage Your Chronic Pain

USAweekend.com recently released an article title “Important tips to manage your chronic pain: 4 sure-fire strategies for feeling better”. The article includes important information on how to practice mindful meditation, supplements, and how to accept your pain (in order to move forward in life). It’s a great read:

Move a little everyday
Chronic pain can be debilitating, all-consuming and even frustrating — especially when you’ve taken every test and tried every medication and you still hurt. You start to think maybe it’s all in your head (it’s not) and there’s nothing else you can do (not true). Research shows the best way to control chronic pain is to tackle it from all fronts; in fact, a published review found that comprehensive pain programs — ones that address biological, psychological and social aspects of pain — are most effective at improving quality of life. For many conditions, medications help; to better manage pain, try these strategies, too

Read the rest of this article on USAweekend.com/

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Lifescript: 7 Ways to Avoid a Rheumatoid Arthritis Flare

7 Ways to Avoid a Rheumatoid Arthritis Flare

Lifescript recently released a well-researched article on Rheumatoid Arthritis. It’s a great read if want to learn more about Rheumatoid Arthritis, such as how it is triggers, how to treat it, and the many ways it can occurs.

If you have rheumatoid arthritis, then you probably know what to do when your symptoms flare: Head straight for the medication! But how can you keep an RA flare from happening in the first place? Here, studies and experts weigh in on how to stay free of joint swelling and muscle pain – and away from the medicine cabinet – for as long as possible…

I was interviewed for prevention tip #6 for Rheumatoid Arthritis:

Rheumatoid Arthritis Flare Trigger #6: Cold, damp weather “Many RA patients have flares when the weather turns cold and damp,” says Moshe Lewis, M.D., a pain management specialist in Redwood City, Calif. “They take a winter vacation in Arizona and I get a postcard saying they’re no longer in pain.”

A study of 151 people conducted at Centro Reumatológico Strusberg in Cordoba, Argentina, found that people with osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis or fibromyalgia reported more pain on cold days. People with RA also reported more pain on days with high humidity and high pressure.

A drop in air pressure (which often accompanies cold, rainy weather) may allow tissues in the body to expand to fill the space, meaning that already inflamed tissue can cause even more joint swelling and pain, according to Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.

Also, pain thresholds may drop in colder weather; cold, rainy days affect mood; and during colder weather people are less likely to be outside getting exercise that keeps arthritis pain in check, says Johns Hopkins.

To prevent a flare: “Don’t cheat on your heating bill during winter,” Lewis says. “Bundle up and wear an extra layer or two when you go out. To warm up fast, take a hot bath or soak in a Jacuzzi.”

Read all 7 ways to avoid a rheumatoid arthritis flare at Lifescript.com.

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What is Reiki, and how does it seem to help with pain?

Reiki

 

In alternative medicine, Reiki is a treatment in which healing energy is channeled from the practitioner to the patient to enhance energy and reduce stress, pain, and fatigue. Practically, Reiki is a Japanese technique for stress reduction and relaxation that is administered by "laying on hands."

 

It works by opening up a channel between healer and patient to transfer energy, a Reiki healer restores the body both physically and mentally. Muscles are relaxed and energy flow is unblocked. This helps reduce physical tension and pain. Anxiety and stress also are reduced, helping to unblock and release emotional pain. Although the patient may not be completely pain free, he or she feels relaxed, refreshed, and is better able to cope with his or her condition.


What has the research shown us about Reiki?

Research has attempted to answer how does Reiki release tension and help the body heal? That question has yet to be answered. Although there is increasing research evidence documenting the effects of Reiki (such as lowered heart rate, blood pressure, and stress hormones; increased immune strength), we have only broad theories as to what causes these effects or the pathways through which the healing occurs.

 

The multileveled, rapid response to Reiki suggests a complex process that engages many body systems, simultaneously or in quick succession, shifting the body from domination by the "fight or flight" (stress) response to the relaxation response, and supporting the body's own healing mechanisms.

 

If you’re interested in trying it, how would you go about finding a qualified practitioner?

Reiki practitioners undergo a series of sessions under the direction of Reiki masters in which they learn to tap into their own universal life energy and transfer it to others. These sessions are called attunements. The first level of training usually consists of four three-hour sessions during which the basic hand positions are taught. A second level of training is offered that allows practitioners to intensify their healing powers to the degree that they can perform long-distance healing through visualization. A Reiki Master is a person who has been attuned to Reiki Levels (1 to 3) and is a Reiki Healer. A Reiki Master usually is a Reiki healer who goes further for attunement as a Reiki Master. Reiki Masters are attuned by Reiki Grand Masters. Practically one can find a Reiki master through websites like www.reiki-masters.org.

 

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Ken McCoy Radio: Featuring Dr. Moshe Lewis

Ken McCoy Radio - Featuring Dr. Moshe Lewis M.D. (The Jet MD)

Ken McCoy recently interviewed me on his radio show. We had a great time discussing what pain management is, what pain management specialists do, and my philosophy regarding pain management in general. Click the play button on the audio player above to listen to our segment. Here’s an overview of what we talked about:




  • Blending the best of eastern and western philosophies to treat pain in the most effective way.
  • The holistic approach to treating pain: Diagnosing should never be done with a cookie-cutter. I get the story behind the pain, look at the patients lifestyle, how chronic is the pain, etc.
  • Avoiding drugs when possible: Many chronic pain disorders can be treated with topical treatments such as gel patches, ultrasound, electricity, acupuncture, etc. This greatly reduces the chance of organ damage and side-effects.
  • Trying to get patients to understand their medication: Medication is extremely important to many, but some forget what their medicine is supposed to be doing for them. Sometimes they no longer need to be taking it.

  • Ken McCoy and I also discuss how I got started as a pain management, physical medicine, and rehabilitation specialist. * We discuss how the holistic approach to treating patients and the future of medicine/health.

  • Why I find it important to raise public awareness of pain management.
  • Why your chronic pain doctor will be your most visited doctor; pain “management” requires specialists who can dedicate themselves to their patients.
  • Why pain management specialists are in high demand right now: We are living older, we are doing more than ever, everyone is personally effected by pain, celebrities find their expertise useful, and they often utilize a holistic approach to treating patients.
  • McCoy and I talk about my latest media appearances. We talk about my latest public service announcement regarding the dangers of RSI and arthritis and how to treat these painful disorders.
  • Insurance companies and their positive relationships with pain management specialists.
  • What some of my everyday patients look like (age, physical activity, etc.)

Listen to the entire episode of Ken McCoy's show

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Managing Your Pain - A Cup Of Cold Water (Part 2)

Listen to Dr. Moshe Lewis and Yvette Scott discuss pain management.


In part 2, we discuss…

  • Healing the entire person - cultural, mental, and physical
    • Acupuncture
    • Prioritized Physical Therapy
    • Pain solutions without opioids
    • psychological support
    • Getting people out-and-about
    • Making time for health
    • About addiction to opioid pain drugs
    • Alcohol and drugs - building tolerance
    • Restorative Yoga

Featuring

  • Dr. Moshe Lewis, MD
  • Yvette Scott, PN
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Tips for Caregivers of Loved Ones with Chronic Pain

Alice Francis and her husband Alan had always been a dynamic and evenly-matched couple. They both worked in high-energy careers that they loved; they traveled the world together; they exercised together regularly, and led extremely active lives. When Alan’s first flares of chronic back pain prevented him from keeping up with their fast-paced lifestyle, Alice quickly realized that their relationship was about to undergo some drastic adjustments.

 

“This transition has been life-changing,” she admitted, “and although I wouldn’t want anyone to have chronic pain, I have learned a lot of lessons regarding pain care and advocating for my spouse in this ‘adventure’ ”.

 

Alice does not like referring to herself as her husband’s “caregiver”, but it is an apt description of the role she has had to fill in Alan’s health care management. As her husband’s treatment progressed through office visits, complex pain regimens, and four corrective surgeries, Alice has taken on an active role in helping her Alan to manage his chronic pain. In the six years since Alan’s degenerative disc disease was first diagnosed, Alice has learned to be an effective champion of her husband’s medical care while maintaining her own positive outlook on life.

 

Thousands of spouses and children of pain sufferers find themselves in Alice’s position every year. Becoming involved in the care and treatment of a suffering loved one is a natural and loving gesture, but it can easily take its toll on even the most patient caregiver. Here are some of Alice’s tips for others who are caring for loved ones suffering from chronic pain.

 

Selecting doctors

  • After you or your partner have researched several doctors, set up “appointments/interviews’ with your top 3 choices.
  • It’s a good idea for you as the partner/caretaker to attend these appointments so that you have two sets of ears. It’s amazing how things can be interpreted differently between the person who is in pain and the person who is there to support!
  • This sounds crazy, but I suggest you and the pain patient dress nicely for the appointment. We have found we are definitely treated with a higher level of credibility and respect.
  • Let the doctor know that you are deciding what will be the best match in terms of a relationship with a new doctor and you have some questions as well. Sometimes I asked the questions and sometimes my husband did. It really depended on his pain and anxiety level that day. If a doctor is reluctant to be “interviewed”, that should tell you something.
  • Take notes! It is very important in all appointments, quite frankly.
  • Here are some good questions to ask at an initial interview:
  1. How long has the doctor provided pain management?
  2. Does the doctor give injections, and if so, where were they trained and what is their general outlook on patient injection needs? (In our experience, doctors who were trained via Mayo Clinic will give only 3 injections per year. Doctors trained in other programs are sometime more open to assessing the number of injections based on the need of the patient.)
  3. What is the doctor’s general philosophy on pain management? If they don’t have one, that’s a red flag.
  4. How many doctors are in the practice? Will patients generally see the doctor or the physician’s assistant?
  5. How far in advance do you need to make an appointment?
  6. Who is the contact when you are unable to reach the doctor?
  7. Will you be able to get copies of all medical records and appointment notes? (I always request this on a monthly or quarterly basis. It’s important to see what the doctor’s interpretation of the appointment was, which can be quite different than yours or the patient’s.)
  8. Has the doctor ever experienced long-term or chronic pain? Although this isn’t a deal-breaker, the doctor’s firsthand experience is a plus. They will most certainly have a high level of compassion and understanding for what the patient is going through.

Alice stresses that finding the right rapport between a doctor and the patient is extremely important, since this doctor-patient relationship could potentially last for years. She found that helping Alan to be proactive about his own emotional needs made it easier to find doctors who were a good match for Alan. “At the beginning of our pain journey, it was very important for my husband to explain to a doctor who he was before pain. He wanted them to have a glimpse of what his life was like before this happened. He was struggling to deal with all the changes going on, and needed people to know that he hadn’t always been the ‘patient’.

 

“Some doctors were very attentive during this dialogue. Others were very dismissive and condescending. Their reaction was almost always a sign of the care and compassion to come. I suggest the patient or caretaker come up with some brief summary of activities and interests prior to the pain and see what kind of reaction you elicit.”

 

Providing care for your loved one

  • Carry a list of all medications and amounts the patient is taking. If there is an emergency situation, it will be necessary to provide the EMT’s or other medical help with that information
  • If you live with the patient you care for, be observant as to what time of day they take their meds. Make it clear that this isn’t policing, but rather just another set of eyes. When someone is in chronic pain, memory can be affected, and it’s just good to have a general idea of your patient’s pattern of medication use.
  • Get to know your pharmacist. I know our pharmacist very well. In fact, I can call the pharmacy and say, “It’s Alice”, and they know who I am! It’s important to build a rapport so that you can ask questions and receive the best customer service possible.
  • LISTEN to your loved one! This was VERY difficult for me to learn. When he would complain about the pain or express frustration, I wanted to ‘fix it”. Listening was not part of my plan. Many times, he didn’t want me to fix anything. He just needed me to say, “That must be really hard”, or “ I’m so sorry you are having to go through this”. Understanding and improving our communication has helped both of us a great deal.

 

Alice offers further perspective on the changing relationship of chronic pain patients and their caregiver companions. “My husband went through not only a huge physical adjustment to dealing with chronic pain, but an equally large psychological adjustment. Without work or exercise or the ability to live an active lifestyle, he just didn’t know who he was anymore. I went through a similar adjustment, I’m sure.

 

“Acknowledging this transition, and how hard it must be, was very important for both of us. Be patient during this time, because your loved one really needs to feel vital and normal. Strongly suggest to your loved one they go see a therapist or psychologist to work through these issues. It can be a huge help to you both.”

 

Take care of yourself

“Of all the things I have done in my life,” says Alice, “taking care of or being in a relationship with someone you love who is in chronic pain is by far the most difficult. In the beginning I felt like my good days were completely dependent on his good days. That’s no way to live.

 

“You do need to provide love, compassion, sometimes some physical and mental support. But you also have to realize that you CANNOT fix or change the situation. You can’t make the person take meds or not take meds. You can’t do physical therapy for them. You can’t take the pain away so you just have to let it go. “I developed a sense of normalcy around all of this. I have a career that I love-- it keeps me very busy. I go shopping and traveling some with girlfriends. I exercise on my own, and do things just for me. This new ‘normal’ life really helps provide Alan with a sense of ‘normal’ as well. I strongly encourage you not to forget about you in this process.”

 

This article is summary and companion article to Taboo Talk's April 6th (2011) radio show/podcast.

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Upcoming Lecture Dates

New Treatments in Neuropathic Pain

  • Tuesday April 12th, Seton Medical Center, Daly City

 

New Treatments for Osteoarthritis

  • Wednesday April 13th, Rancho Cucamonga, LA
  • Thursday April 14th, Las Vegas, NV
  • Monday April 18th, Support Group, Fort Lauderdale, FL
  • Wednesday April 27th, LA, CA

 

New Treatments in Chronic Pain

  • Tuesday April 26th, Yountville, CA
  • Thursday April 28th, 2011 Santa Cruz, CA
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Open house with Herculiza, spORTHOcare owner

SpORTHOcare Banner3

 

Tomorrow (Saturday April 8th, 2011), I will be attending my business partner and friend Liza Reichenberger’s open house for her new startup pain management company ‘spORTHOcare’. Liza is also known as “Herculiza”, the world famous all-natural body builder and winner of WNBF’s Universe 2008. Liza has been lifting weights for decades and continues to compete in competitions on the side as she builds her company.

 

Stop by for snacks and refreshments!

Feel free to stop by to take a look at Liza’s gym, offices, and meet the famous body builder herself. Both of us will be there to answer any questions you have about spORTHOcare and pain management in general. Hope to see you there!

 

Learn more about Liza:

Liza Reichenberger knows about pain. Suffering from chronic and severe pain secondary to familial osteoarthritis and degenerative disc disease, she has “a horrid neck” with a large herniated disc and multiple bone spurs causing her daily pain – especially in the morning as she struggles to move upon awakening. Three different spine surgeons have recommended cervical decompression and fusion. Their advice? Stop exercising. Yea, sure.

You don’t tell “Herculiza,” the greatest natural female bodybuilder of all time, to stop working out. But, like most people, Reichenberger did what she was told and followed her doctor’s advice. She stopped all upper body weight training for 6 months. Big mistake.

“I completely fell apart!” she says. “The pain became even worse.” When she returned to the gym and resumed her zero-impact conditioning and resistance program, her pain subsided dramatically.

 

Read the rest of the article “Local bodybuilding legend helps patients conquer pain

Herculiza on Facebook

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Dr. Moshe Lewis on TV - Special on Heart Disease and Managing Your Pain



Dr. Moshe Lewis will be interviewing Dr. John Cunniff of the Stanford Medical Center for two special segments titled "Heart Diseases: A Silent Killer" and "Managing Your Pain." Both of these specials will be featured on channel 15 (Comcast) at these times:


Heart Disease: A Silent Killer

Thursday, March 17 @ 6:30p.m.
Saturday, March 19 @ 9:30a.m.
Sunday, March 20 @ 1:00 p.m.
Tuesday, March 22 @ 7:30 p.m.

Managing Your Pain

Thursday, March 24 @ 7:30p.m.
Saturday, March 26 @ 9:30a.m.
Sunday, March 27 @ 1:00 p.m.
Tuesday, March 29 @ 7:30p.m.

Both specials will be live-streamed at creatvsj.org
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People With Chronic Pain Face Complex Dilemmas And Life-Changing Decisions

Medical News Today


This article validates our patients on-going struggles with chronic pain.

Coping with chronic pain can affect every aspect of a person's life and cause conflict between what their mind wants to achieve and what their body allows them to do, according to research in the December issue of the Journal of Nursing and Healthcare of Chronic Illness. Swedish researchers carried out in-depth interviews with ten people who had experienced chronic pain for between four and 32 years and were taking part in an outpatient rehabilitation programme. Nine of the patients, who ranged from 22 to 50 with an average age of 38, were unable to work because of their pain.



Click here to read the rest of the article, via MedicalNewsToday.com

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Must-Know Strategies for (Health) Success

Be as Healthy as this statue!

Danny McLarty has written a great article in his favorite strategies for having a successful diet and healthy lifestyle. I recommend everyone read it; I hope it helps.

Whether you’re just starting out on the fitness lifestyle, looking for a way to get inspired, or a way to bust through a plateau, incorporating these simple tips will set you up for success.

Frame Goals Around Behaviors

Far too many people focus on the outcome. Yes, the outcome is the end result of what we hope to achieve, but focusing on nothing but the outcome does nothing to address what it will take to reach your goals.

Not sure what I mean? Here, let me give you an example.

Most people’s goals are outcome-based, and look something like this:

“I want to lose 15 pounds in 12 weeks.” Or,
“I want to be ‘bikini ready’ for my upcoming trip to Hawaii.”

Yeah, of course it’d be great if that happened, but how are you going to get to these goals? This is where focusing your goals around behaviors comes in!

Read more at Danny's blog: (http://oliciouslife.com)

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ABC News Interviews Dr. Moshe about Alternative Pain Treatments

Moshe on ABC 7
Click here to Watch the ABC7 Video

About the Video
ABC7's Emmy award-winning public affairs show, "Beyond the Headlines," provides in-depth coverage of the topics and issues facing the people of the Bay Area. Throughout the year, "Beyond the Headlines" airs half-hour specials on issues, ranging from Bay Area housing to same-sex marriage.

Today we are going to talk about chronic pain. We will hear from doctors who specialize in treating pain, and learn about some of the alternative treatments to help combat this issue.

(via ABC7)

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